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A A A A Author Topic: CX Coolant  (Read 1792 times)

Seagrass

CX Coolant
« Started on: 25-Jul-07, 12:33 »
After much discussion over several topics and many months/years I thought it would be good to document a suitable coolant here. If a bike can run for 210,000Km's I think that that is good enough for me and probably most others. Joe advises "The engine cooling passageways are perfectly clean and unpitted, the pump and mechanical seal is perfect, the radiator is clean as a whistle and I am still using the original top and bottom radiator hoses."  The coolant used in this bike (CX500-EC) is Castrol Antifreeze/Antiboil (green in colour) at 50/50 mix of coolant and water. How can you argue with those facts? Seagrass

VladTepes

Re: CX Coolant
« Reply #1 on: 24-Apr-12, 23:59 »
Sounds pretty basic. Should work fine methinks.

Glen

Re: CX Coolant
« Reply #2 on: 25-Apr-12, 11:04 »
Couldn't agree more!

SlotBaker

Re: CX Coolant
« Reply #3 on: 03-Sep-19, 16:21 »
Hi all, thought I resurrect this old thread for an update.

I need to flush out and refill my CX650 coolant sytem and was looking at using the Castrol Radicool Concentrate, which is described as "Castrol Anti Freeze/Boil 2.5L 3377732".

So I figured that I'd check the details on the Castrol website, and I don't see that it is silicate free!

Is this the correct stuff to use?

Also, what is best for flushing out the system?
2huh

TIA.

bahn88

Re: CX Coolant
« Reply #4 on: 04-Sep-19, 13:36 »
You could go on this topic for another few years....I looked into this some time ago as well.
Most classic car clubs recommend older style coolants (IAT) that were/are not necessarily silicate free to protect brass and solder.  My understanding is that modern coolants if not silicate free are very low in silicates compared to 30 years ago. Some good quality bike-specific coolant e.g. Motorex M5 is  used for earlier KTMs and is not silicate free.

The key is to change the coolant every 2-3 years before things can start to degrade/precipitate out.

BTW: Sidecar bob  (USA Goldwing and CX500 forum) puts the need to use a silicate free coolant as a urban myth....its a "moly link" but he refers to the coolant myth...

https://cx500forum.com/forum/technical-help-forum/18104-honda-moly-60-paste-vs-loctite-moly-65-paste.html

And yes I might have re-activated the "moly" thread......




Seagrass

Re: CX Coolant
« Reply #5 on: 04-Sep-19, 17:23 »
You could go on this topic for another few years....I looked into this some time ago as well.
Most classic car clubs recommend older style coolants (IAT) that were/are not necessarily silicate free to protect brass and solder.  My understanding is that modern coolants if not silicate free are very low in silicates compared to 30 years ago. Some good quality bike-specific coolant e.g. Motorex M5 is  used for earlier KTMs and is not silicate free.

The key is to change the coolant every 2-3 years before things can start to degrade/precipitate out.

BTW: Sidecar bob  (USA Goldwing and CX500 forum) puts the need to use a silicate free coolant as a urban myth....its a "moly link" but he refers to the coolant myth...

https://cx500forum.com/forum/technical-help-forum/18104-honda-moly-60-paste-vs-loctite-moly-65-paste.html

And yes I might have re-activated the "moly" thread......


I think you are getting your coolant types mixed up.

The problem with silicate is that it wears away the mechanical seal prematurely causing coolant leaks.

The new type “organic” coolants (typically red in colour) dissolve solder and the instructions advise they are to be used on modern cooling systems that do not contain solder.

I do agree that levels of silicates in current ethylene glycol based coolants are probably so low that they would not be a serious problem.

Seagrass

bahn88

Re: CX Coolant
« Reply #6 on: 04-Sep-19, 18:55 »
My post was a lil abbreviated-

Maybe should have read-Most classic car clubs recommend older style coolants (IAT),that were/are not necessarily silicate free, IAT (inorganic) coolants are said to protect brass and solder in older vehicles"

I would think also that the ethylene glycol based coolants many of us used previously were green IAT, and high in silica-there is an issue also with swapping over to OAT (red coolants)that may not be fully negated by a single radiator flush.

  [ You are not allowed to view attachments ]  

I'm not a CX expert and yourself and CXPHREAK have helped immensely in the early days.  :hatoff:  I do however have degrees in chemistry and bio-chemistry so coolants oils and plastics I'll freely offer an opinion and stick to it...

Kathy

Re: CX Coolant
« Reply #7 on: 06-Sep-19, 14:14 »
I need to flush out and refill my CX650 coolant sytem and was looking at using the Castrol Radicool Concentrate, which is described as "Castrol Anti Freeze/Boil 2.5L 3377732".

So I figured that I'd check the details on the Castrol website, and I don't see that it is silicate free!  Is this the correct stuff to use?
@SlotBaker  Castrol Radicool SF-O is the silicate free version of this Castrol product.

Also, the product you mentioned is a concentrate and will need to be diluted 50:50 with distilled or demineralised water.  If you end up buying a premix product make sure it's a 50:50 mix as there are quite a few 33:66 mix products (they are normally cheaper than the higher concentration products) and these are not suitable for the CX engine.  Finally, make sure the product you buy is suitable for use in aluminium engines and with copper/brass radiators.

Extract from an owners manual of a later model liquid-cooled Honda motorcycle:
"The owner must properly maintain the coolant to prevent freezing, overheating, and corrosion.

Use only high quality ethylene glycol anti-freeze containing corrosion protection inhibitors specifically recommended for use in aluminum engines.

Use only low-mineral drinking water or distilled water as a part of the anti-freeze solution. Water that is high in mineral content or salt may be harmful to the aluminum engine.

Using coolant with silicate inhibitors may cause premature wear of water pump seals or blockage of radiator passages. Using tap water may cause engine damage.

The factory provides a 50/50 solution of antifreeze and distilled water in this motorcycle.   This coolant solution is recommended for most operating temperatures and provides good corrosion protection.

A higher concentration of antifreeze decreases the cooling system performance and is recommended only when additional protection against freezing is needed. 

A concentration of less than 40/60 (40% antifreeze) will not provide proper corrosion protection.

During freezing temperatures, check the cooling system frequently and add higher concentrations of antifreeze (up to a maximum of 60% antifreeze) if required."

SlotBaker

Re: CX Coolant
« Reply #8 on: 06-Sep-19, 19:41 »
 happy0158
Thanks Kathy, for your clarification.
 2smiley

 


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